Headlines in Reproductive Medicine

The following links have been gleaned from current news to help keep you informed on reproductive medicine's impact on our world. Note:  Some newspapers and periodicals require free registration to access their online articles. The links on this page may expire within a week of posting; however, most news web sites keep online archives with articles offered either free or available for purchase. WARNING! THE ASRM HAS NOT REVIEWED THE CONTENTS OF THE EXTERNAL WEB SITES LISTED ON THIS PAGE, NOR CAN WE ENDORSE THEM OR THE VIEWS EXPRESSED WITHIN.  

East Meets West: Treating Infertility With Acupuncture And Modern Medicine

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 24, 2015

The ancient Chinese practice of acupuncture is fast-becoming an accepted supplement to modern-day assisted reproductive technology that helps infertile couples become parents.“More doctors are open to referring patients to complementary medicine for their reproductive health as well as for their emotional well-being,” says Mimi Baker, a licensed acupuncturist in Princeton, New Jersey, who practices traditional Chinese medicine and works in conjunction with fertility experts.

Mother’s Smoking May Affect Girls’ Lifetime Reproductive Health

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 24, 2015

Girls whose mothers smoked while pregnant entered puberty at a younger age in a new Australian study. Since early menstruation is linked to higher risk of uterine, endometrial and breast cancers later in life, the researchers say that maternal smoking could set up daughters for health problems even before they’re born.

An Unspoken Peril For Our Injured Troops: Infertility

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 23, 2015

A 2008 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that 15 percent of soldiers deployed in Iraq suffered an injury that involved loss of consciousness, a figure that extrapolates out to 480,000 affected Iraq veterans. Such injuries, often from roadside bombs or improvised explosive devices (IEDs), can cause a kind of injury often left un-discussed: Infertility.

Can A High Protein, Low-Carb Diet Increase Fertility In Women

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 23, 2015

Jenna Birch, reporting on Shape magazine’s Website, describes an intriguing new study raising hopes that someday women might be able to increase their chances of getting pregnant by changing their diets.For the study, Australian researchers put 858 mice on one of 25 diets involving various levels of proteins, carbohydrates, fat and calories.

IVF Nutrients May Dictate if the Baby's a Boy or Girl

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 20, 2015

Will it be a boy or a girl? For people undergoing IVF, the nutrient-rich liquid their embryos grow in could tip the balance. The finding adds to mounting evidence that the culture medium is playing a role in an embryo's development and future health.

Get Ready for Embryos From Two Men or Two Women

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 20, 2015

Genetic research is advancing to the day when gay couples could fulfill their dreams of having children related to them both.

Children Born Via Assisted Reproductive Technology at Greater Risk for Autism

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 20, 2015

Children born as a result of assisted reproductive technology were twice as likely to have autism compared with those born without reproductive assistance, according to study findings in the American Journal of Public Health.

Bill Would Require Fertility Benefits For Lesbians

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 20, 2015

A bill that would grant married lesbian couples the same fertility treatment benefits as husbands and wives is advancing in the Maryland General Assembly. The measure passed unanimously in a House subcommittee Tuesday, and full Senate and House committees are likely to vote this week.

Ethics Of Embryo Editing Divides Scientists

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 19, 2015

Research that uses powerful gene-editing techniques on human embryos needs to be restricted, scientists agree — but they are split over why.Some say that if safety fears can be allayed, such applications could have a bright future, and could help to eradicate devastating diseases.

We Tried For Years To Get Pregnant. Here’s What I Wish People Hadn’t Said To Us.

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine March 19, 2015

My husband and I tried for more than two years to get pregnant with our son. The second year was full of difficult fertility tests and treatments.

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